24 Hour BJOC Fundraiser

24 Hour BJOC Fundraiser

20150519 BJOC Fundraiser

 

We need your help!

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Through an amazing opportunity the Bensalem Outreach Kollel put together an online “chariDy” fund raiser where if we can raise $25,000 in 24 hours, we have 3 matching gifts which means our $25,000 becomes $100,000. If we don’t reach $25,000 in 24 hours, the Outreach Center gets nothing. Very simple, it’s all or nothing. The 24 hours start TODAY (Tuesday) at 12:00 this afternoon – till 12:00 tomorrow (Wednesday) afternoon. A bunch of guys, myself included, who want to help make this happen are sending emails to our friends to pool our efforts to help reach this goal. 

To see a video about the work of the Outreach Center, please go to this link:

2015 Dinner Video:    http://youtu.be/q_vzfqYY2YI

 

Please go to this link to participate and join our efforts:

www.charidy.com/bjoc

 

If you are willing to, please join me and forward this to a few of your friends. All we need is to help raise these funds and your participation will help make this happen.

Thanks for helping to make this happen,

Moishe

 

Help the miracle grow!!!

They told us “when I have hair on the palm of my hand there will be a shul in Bensalem”.

It’s a miracle that we have a shul, built from scratch with a minyan meeting three times a day, seven days a week.

It’s a miracle that we built a mikvah, a beautiful work of art, renowned throughout the county for its beauty, servicing Jews from all over Bucks County.

It’s a miracle that we have created a Kollel, dynamic rabbi’s and their wives, most of whom live here in Bensalem, studying and teaching their knowledge with Jews throughout Bucks County.

It’s a miracle that we have a vibrant Hebrew school teaching children and their parents about their heritage, and bringing them closer to Judaism.

It’s a miracle that we have a full time outreach director, dedicated to bringing Jews closer to their heritage 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

It’s a miracle that we have a women’s conference, women’s trips to Israel, women’s learning, and women’s programming

It’s a miracle that we have completed an expansion and renovation of our Outreach Center, making it a beautiful place for learning, programs, and outreach

And It’s a miracle that we continue to expand!!! Please help us expand, as we raise funds today to keep our Kollel in Bensalem and provide housing for our Kollel families to live and settle down here as they do their amazing and dedicated work of outreach to the community. 

 

Please go to this link to participate and join our efforts:

www.charidy.com/bjoc

 

Moishe Travitsky

Bensalem Kollel and Outreach Center

2446 Bristol Road

Bensalem, Pa. 19020

267-228-8774

Parshas Behar/Bechukosai | The Kollel Connection

Parshas Behar/Bechukosai | The Kollel Connection

Bensalem Jewish Outreach Center

May 15, 2015 – Candle lighting 7:50 pm, Shabbos Ends 8:59 pm

Note: Times are for Bensalem; Check your local calendar for exact times in your area.

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Welcome to the Kollel Connection.

We appreciate your comments and feedback.

The Kollel connection is dedicated this week by Steve and Jane Levson, in honor of the birth of their new granddaughter,  Shoshana Bluma Levson. Mazel Tov to the parents, Scott and Miriam Levson, and to all the grandparents, Steve and Jane Levson, and  Cantor Aryeh and Adina Samberg. May they see only nachas from Shoshana Bluma, from all their children and all their grandchildren, ad bias goel tzedeck bemihairah beyamainu, until the coming of messiah soon and in our days!!

This week we read Parshas Behar and Bechukosai.  In Parshas Behar, one of the mitzvahs that the Torah tells us about is the mitzvah to help a fellow Jew if he becomes impoverished. “If your brother becomes poor, and his hand becomes weakened with you, you shall strengthen him…” (Leviticus 25:35) The commentaries ask, what is the meaning of the words  “with you”? Was the person who is helping out his brother also poor?

The Ben ish chai explains this with a most powerful story. There was a king once who was very wealthy and powerful. He decided that his son, the prince, should have a tutor who could teach him all the great wisdom of the world, so that one day when he would become the king, he would be knowledgeable and know all the things that a person had to know to be a good monarch. He hired the best tutor of the land, who spent many hours teaching the prince all the wisdom that there is to know.  When the prince was finished his studies, the king came himself to personally test him and to see if he had really learnt properly. The prince passed with flying colors. The king was so excited and happy, that he rewarded the teacher with over a hundred thousand gold coins from his treasure house, and gave him much honor.

A short while later, this wise man came to the king and told him, “I left out one thing that I did not teach your son. Can you send the prince to me for one hour for one final lesson”? Of course the king was very happy to do so.  When the prince arrived the wise man locked the doors and began to beat the prince up. For one hour, the prince suffered blow after blow. Finally, he was let out to go home, all battered and bruised. When the king saw what the wise man had done to his son, he immediately sent his soldiers to take the wise man and to hang him on the gallows. Before they hung the wise man, the king asked that he be brought to him. “Please explain to me, he said, why did you do such a crazy  thing and attack the prince”?

The wise man answered, “please understand, your majesty, I served you faithfully all these years. You asked me to teach your son all that he needed to know to be a good king. I taught him all the book knowledge that I could. Yet, one lesson he had not learned. When a case comes before him, and he sentences the criminal to lashes, how could the prince know the difference between giving 5 lashes, 20 lashes, or 50 lashes? He had never experienced a finger being lifted against him in his life!! Therefore, I felt he had to feel one time what the pain of getting lashes was, in order that he would be able to properly judge people when he one day is the king”.  When the king heard the wise man’s explanation, he immediately took off his death sentence, and sent him back home to his original position of honor.

This is the idea that the Torah is trying to convey to us. When we look at a poor person, it’s not enough for us to just want to help him. We must first feel what it’s like to be in his shoes, feel as if we were the ones who are poor, and what we would want. Only then can we really try to properly help our fellow Jew.

Wishing you and your family a Great Shabbos!!!!!!!! 

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

To sponsor an issue of the Kollel Connection, please email BJOC@bensalemoutreach.org  Sponsorships are only $36 a week.

Parshas Emor | The Kollel Connection

Parshas Emor | The Kollel Connection

Bensalem Jewish Outreach Center

May 8, 2015 – Candle lighting 7:43 pm, Shabbos Ends 8:52 pm

Note: Times are for Bensalem; Check your local calendar for exact times in your area.

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Welcome to the Kollel Connection.

We appreciate your comments and feedback.

This week we read Parshas Emor.  In Parshas Emor, the Torah tells us about the mitzvah of Peah, the mitzvah that every owner of a field had to leave the corner of their field for the poor people. Our sages tell us that the requirement is to leave it before the poor people is literally just that: we have to leave it for them to come and to take it. We are not allowed to help the poor people and to give it to them.  The commentaries ask, why is this? Wouldn’t it be very special for the owner of the field to go himself and help the poor people get the produce that the Torah has given them?

There are several approaches to this question, two of them that we would like to share with you:

1 – When the owner of the field gives out the produce, he feels that he is boss here, he is the one in charge, and he is the one distributing the produce to the poor people. The Torah didn’t want that, so the Torah insisted that the poor people take it themselves – it is their gift from Hashem , they are not beholden to any human being for this, only to Hashem.

2 – A person who has to take charity is embarrassed by this. That is why the Torah did not want the giving away of the produce that is charity to be given by the owner of the field. Rather, the Torah said that he should not even be in the field at all, when it’s given out. The lesson we take from this is, that it’s not enough for us to just say that we give, rather a person has to consider the way we give it. How we give charity – not just whether we give it, decides how special and valuable our mitzvah of giving charity is in the eyes of Hashem.

Wishing you and your family a Great Shabbos!!!!!!!! 

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

To sponsor an issue of the Kollel Connection, please email BJOC@bensalemoutreach.org  Sponsorships are only $36 a week.

Parshas Acharai Mos/Kedoshim | The Kollel Connection

Parshas Acharai Mos/Kedoshim | The Kollel Connection

Bensalem Jewish Outreach Center

May 1, 2015 – Candle lighting 7:36 pm, Shabbos Ends 8:45 pm

Note: Times are for Bensalem; Check your local calendar for exact times in your area.

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Welcome to the Kollel Connection.

We appreciate your comments and feedback.

This week we read Parshas Acharai Mos and Kedoshim.  In Parshas Kedoshim, the Torah tells us many of the commandments affecting our relationships with our fellow Jew. One of them is, “Do not hate your brother in your heart.” (Leviticus 19:17) The classic commentary Ohr Hachaim asks, why would the Torah not first finish telling us not to feel hatred in our heart, and then explain the person we are referring to (a brother)?

The Ohr Hachaim answers, that the Torah is teaching us the amount of hatred we can’t have. Even to just feel that someone is less than our brother, is already transgressing the prohibition of hatred.

The Talmud tells us that if someone doesn’t speak with another person for three days because they are upset with them, they are considered an enemy. They are not allowed to be a judge in a case for him. The sin of baseless hatred is so severe that it caused the destruction of the Temple, and to this day has prevented it from being rebuilt. A sobering realization is this point – that emotions can already be called hatred if they simply make us feel that we don’t want to relate to someone as a brother.  Our Sages stress the severity of this sin, telling us that in punishment for the sin of baseless hatred quarrels and disputes arise in one’s home, and tragedies come to one’s family, r’l.

How can we change the feelings of hatred we harbor to others? Our Sages give us one piece of advice: If you want to come to love your fellow Jew, get involved in doing good things for him. When we help others, the feelings of resentment and ill will that we had for him will slowly dissipate. Instead we will find ourselves  feelings of care, concern, and of love for our fellow Jew. This is the amazing power that giving to others has, as it changes our perspective and helps us relate to them with the feelings of love and warmth that the Torah expects from us.

Wishing you and your family a Great Shabbos!!!!!!!! 

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

To sponsor an issue of the Kollel Connection, please email BJOC@bensalemoutreach.org  Sponsorships are only $36 a week.

Parshas Shemini | The Kollel Connection

Parshas Shemini | The Kollel Connection

Bensalem Jewish Outreach Center

April 17, 2015 – Candle lighting 7:22 pm, Shabbos Ends 8:31 pm

Note: Times are for Bensalem; Check your local calendar for exact times in your area.

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Welcome to the Kollel Connection.

We appreciate your comments and feedback.

This week we read Parshas Shemini. In Parshas Shemini, the basic laws of kosher are given. We are told that  for an animal to be kosher, it must have two signs: it must chew its cud, and have split feet (hooves). Rav Moshe Sternbach explains that the two signs of an animal being kosher represent two types of behavior: Chewing the cud is internal. By looking at the animal from the outside, one can’t tell if it chews its cud or it doesn’t. This represents the actions a person does internally, that no one sees. Having split hooves, on the other hand, is external. By looking at the animal from the outside one sees right away whether the animal has split hooves or not. This represents the actions that a person does externally, that everyone sees. With the signs of what makes an animal kosher, the Torah teaches us that we must act like good Jews both on the inside and on the outside. If a person acts like a Jew, but their heart is far from Hashem, that is unacceptable. So too, if a person feels that they have a “Jewish heart”- but they are reluctant to act like a Jew on the outside, that is unacceptable. They have just rendered themselves as a “non-kosher” being. We have to serve Hashem both on the inside –  in our hearts, and in our recognizable external deeds.

In the classic work mesillas yeshorim, the author explains that in one way the prohibitions regarding food are more severe than all other prohibitions. He explains that this is because the food we eat actually becomes part of us. If there is something wrong with it, it changes our very essence. Just as no sane human being would eat poison, so too no thinking person would eat something not kosher, that will alter his or her very being on such a bad way. He goes on to say, that even when one has a doubt whether something is kosher they must stay away from it – just as they would if they were not sure if there was poison in it.

The medrash brings out this point in a most amazing way, with a lesson that can alter our eating habits forever. The medrash tells us that when Abraham and Sarah were celebrating the birth of Isaac, there were those who doubted whether Sarah was really the mother of this baby. After all, she was already 90 years old! In order to test her, they each brought their own infant and challenged Sarah – this 90 year old woman – to see if she could nurse them. Sarah did, and they accepted the miracle that at her advanced age she had given birth to Isaac. The medrash says that the children who nursed from Sarah all ended up converting to Judaism, and if we find someone today who converts and becomes a Jew, he or she is a descendant from those who nursed from Sarah.

The obvious point is, not only does bad food that we eat have a destructive force upon us. The food that we eat as a mitzvah, with a properly said blessing, with positive focus –  intent to be healthy and serve Hashem, then we actually can grow from the experience of eating. Unlike an animal that simply eats to exist, we can become elevated and closer to our Creator by eating the food that he provides us.

Wishing you and your family a Great Shabbos!!!!!!!! 

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

To sponsor an issue of the Kollel Connection, please email BJOC@bensalemoutreach.org  Sponsorships are only $36 a week.

Parshas Tsav | The Kollel Connection

Parshas Tsav | The Kollel Connection

Bensalem Jewish Outreach Center

March 27, 2015 – Candle lighting 7:00 pm, Shabbos Ends 8:09 pm

Note: Times are for Bensalem; Check your local calendar for exact times in your area.

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Welcome to the Kollel Connection.

The Kollel connection this week is dedicated in honor of all the Jewish housewives who are working so hard to prepare Passover for their families. May Hashem give them only nachas and the joy of a beautiful holiday with their loved ones.

We appreciate your comments and feedback.

This week we read Parshas Tsav. In the parsha, we learn the details. of the various sacrifices that were offered in the temple. One of the sacrifices was a korban Todah, a thanksgiving offering. This sacrifice was offered by anyone who experienced any of the following four circumstances: A sick  person who recovered from their illness,  a person who was freed from incarceration, and a person who safely traveled over an ocean or through a desert. While these are the four cases that Jewish law requires to bring a sacrifice,  the truth is that every person has to feel appreciation and express gratitude for every minute of life that they have. Our sages express this thought by saying the following: “For every breath of air that a person takes,  he must thank G-d”. Rav Chiya bar Abba added,  the soul of a person seeks to leave this physical world all the time, but Hashem does not let this happen.  Rav Levi in the name of Rav Chanina explained, for every breath that a person takes,  he or she must praise Hashem.

In the amida prayer that we say three times a day,  we say the following words: ” Vchol Hachaim yoducha selah” – “And EVERY live person will thank you.” The commentaries explain that the word EVERY comes to stress that every single person,  no matter what their circumstances, must thank Hashem for the very life that they have. Even a person who is going through trying times, must try to recognize and feel gratitude for the very life that they have.

There is a beautiful story told that illustrates this point in a most powerful way. A group of people got lost in Siberia, in the middle of a dark night. As the night progressed, they were feeling the bitter cold winds that seemed to affect every part of their body, with no idea where to go. To make matters worse, their provisions had run out, they didn’t have adequate clothing, and as the night went on they felt their very life ebbing from them. Just as time was about to run out, a person miraculously appeared, and took them into his warm house, providing them with food, drink and shelter. Is it conceivable that any of these travelers who were on the verge of dying, would be crazy enough to complain that his co-traveler got a bigger piece than he did? Would they say something about not having a big enough pillow? Certainly every person there would feel immense gratitude to their host for the selfless act he did in saving their life.

This is the  feeling that we must have to Hashem. We have to feel gratitude to Him for every breath that we take, for the eyes that we can see with, for the ears that we can listen with, and all the other parts of our bodies that function. If the feelings of gratitude are truly felt, hopefully any feeling we had of jealousy, depression, and unhappiness will dissipate. Instead of complaining, we will feel true joy with what we have, and enjoy the great gifts that Hashem has given us to their fullest.

Wishing you and your family a Great Shabbos!!!!!!!! 

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

To sponsor an issue of the Kollel Connection, please email BJOC@bensalemoutreach.org  Sponsorships are only $36 a week.

Parshas Vayikrah | The Kollel Connection

Parshas Vayikrah | The Kollel Connection

Bensalem Jewish Outreach Center

March 20, 2015 – Candle lighting 6:54 pm, Shabbos Ends 7:53 pm

Note: Times are for Bensalem; Check your local calendar for exact times in your area.

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Welcome to the Kollel Connection.

The Kollel connection this week is dedicated in honor of the birth of Bris of  Zevy Biron. Mazel tov to parents Naftoli and Tzirel Leah Biron, and to Grandparents Rabbi Asher and Chani Biron, and Rabbi Moshe and Malky Travitsky.

We appreciate your comments and feedback.

This week we read Parshas Vayikrah. The Parsha begins with the word Vayikra, (and He called), which means that Hashem called to Moses to tell him the laws that are discussed in the Parsha. In a most unusual change, the last letter in the word vayikra – which is an aleph, is written smaller than the rest of the letters in the Torah. The Sages ask, why is this written so differently than regular?   The Sages tell us, that Moses really didn’t want to write the letter aleph at all at the end of the word vayikra. If he would have left out that letter, it would have spelled the word vayikar – which means that Hashem chanced upon Moses. This wording would show much less importance to Moses – it would indicate that Hashem spoke to Moses when He “chanced” upon him, but not that Hashem specifically called him. Hashem wanted the idea that He called Moses, an expression of Hashem’s love and connection to him, to be used. Moses, in his great humility, wanted to write vayikar – which would have shown just that Hashem was not so close to him. The end result was that Moses did write the aleph, but was allowed to make it small.

The commentaries ask, if we are being taught the lesson of humility, why couldn’t Hashem allow Moses to leave out the letter  aleph all together and write vayikar? Would the lesson of the importance of humility be that much stronger if the vayikar (and He chanced upon) was used?

The late Torah Sage Rav Eliezer Shach explains, that there is a second lesson being taught to us here. If the word Vayikar (and He chanced upon) was used, a terrible mistake could be made. A person may think that there is such a thing as “chance” in the life of a Jew. In truth, nothing ever happens by chance.  There is no such a thing as “chance” in the life of a Jew.  A person must always realize that whatever is happening to them in life is happening for a reason. We can never feel alone or abandoned.  In order to reinforce this lesson the Torah used the word vayikra (and He called) rather then vayikar (and He chanced upon).

In this  one small aleph we are taught two huge lessons, the importance of humility and at the same time the importance of recognizing the hand of Hashem that guides every step of our everyday life.

Wishing you and your family a Great Shabbos!!!!!!!! 

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

To sponsor an issue of the Kollel Connection, please email BJOC@bensalemoutreach.org  Sponsorships are only $36 a week.


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