Posts Tagged 'Messiah'

Parshas Devorim | The Kollel Connection

Parshas Devorim | The Kollel Connection

Bensalem Jewish Outreach Center

August 1, 2014 – Candle lighting 7:55, Shabbos Ends 9:02

Note: Times are for Bensalem; Check your local calendar for exact times in your area.

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Welcome to the Kollel Connection.

We appreciate your comments and feedback.

The Kollel Connection is dedicated this week in merit of all the soldiers who are fighting to protect the Jewish people in Israel. It is also in memory of the fallen heroes who gave their lives to save other Jews in Israel. May Hashem help and protect the entire Jewish people, and destroy all the wicked people who want to harm the Jewish people.  

This week we read Parshas Devorim. The Shabbos, which is the Shabbos before Tisha B’av,  (the fast day on which both the first temple and the second temple were destroyed), is also known as Shabbos Chazon, for the Haftorah of the week that begins with the words Chazon Yeshaya – a vision from Isaiah. In the haftorah, Isaiah laments how a cow knows its owner, and a donkey knows the feeding trough of its master. However, the Jewish people don’t recognize their master – Hashem.

The commentary Ubesoraso Yehege asks the following question: it is understandable that the prophet complains when a Jew doesn’t even act like a cow that knows its owner, while the Jew doesn’t know Hashem. However, what is the praise of the donkey that knows that trough of its owner? After all, it is simply looking for food for itself?

He explains that the point Isaiah was making, is that a donkey has total trust in the feeding trough of its owner. The donkey doesn’t think for a minute that it might have to find sources of nourishment. Rather, it relies on its owner. Isaiah demanded that the Jewish people also show their reliance on Hashem, and trust in Him.

This point is especially important in these days. As we join the entire Jewish world in praying for the success of the Israeli soldiers in Gaza, we must know that our success and safety is totally in the hands of Hashem. Let us unite in prayer and extra mitzvohs as a merit that no more Jewish blood be spilt, and that those who wish to harm Jews be totally destroyed. May we soon see the day of the coming of Messiah, the rebuilding of the Temple, and the ingathering of all Jews back to the land of Israel!!!

Wishing you and your family a Great Shabbos!!!!!!!! 

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

To sponsor an issue of the Kollel Connection, please email BJOC@bensalemoutreach.org  Sponsorships are only $36 a week.

Advertisements

Parshas Korach | The Kollel Connection

Parshas Korach | The Kollel Connection

Bensalem Jewish Outreach Center

June 20, 2014 – Candle lighting 8:14, Shabbos Ends 9:22

Note: Times are for Bensalem; Check your local calendar for exact times in your area.

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Welcome to the Kollel Connection.

We appreciate your comments and feedback.

The Kollel Connection is dedicated this week in memory of Miriam Schwartz, late mother of Noreen Sagoskin. May her neshama – her soul – have an elevation through these words of Torah, and may her family be comforted among the other mourners of Israel and of Jerusalem. 

This week we read Parshas Korach. In the Parsha, the Torah tells us of the terrible episode of the argument and rebellion made by Korach and his followers against Moses. There are many lessons from the episode. Our Sages tell us that Korach was a very great person – so great that he attracted many followers in his rebellion. He was great enough to have people who were heads of Sanhedrin, of Jewish courts, agree with him. What caused such a great person to foolishly challenge Moses? Our Sages tell us that it was jealousy – a clear lesson in the power of bad character traits to affect even the greatest of people.

Today we would like to focus on another lesson from the story of Korach – the power of machlokes – argument. Maimonides wrote a powerful summation of what machlokes – argument does: “Prophets have prophesized, Wise men have said words of wisdom, and they have tried to describe the evil of machlokes – argument; but they have not been able to describe it in its entirety.” (Last will of Maimonides)

Rav Chaim Pilagi, writes “I have seen throughout my life, every man and woman, family, city, or country that had an argument with another, neither side emerged clean. Both suffered physically and monetarily.”  In his classic work Kaf Hachaim (Chapter 27) he writes “I saw with my own eyes, that every home that had an argument on Friday as Shabbos approached, or on Friday night, suffered during the following week. Something bad happened to them.

One time on a Friday night I heard my neighbor arguing with his wife after the Kiddush regarding some part of the meal. I arose from my own table and walked over to his house, and sat down by his table. When they saw me, they quickly made peace. Whenever I met him afterwards, he always thanked me and told me that that Friday night was a turning point in his life; from then on he never fought with his wife…

I have written this in my book in order that others will learn from me and do so with their neighbors, and bring salvation to the world. If one involves himself in making peace between his fellow man, and between spouses, it is impossible that he himself will instigate a fight, and thus peace with be increased in the world…”

The story is told of Rav Yoizel Horowitz, (the alter of Nevardick), who was once informed that a great supporter of Torah had died in Germany, and had left his building for the Yeshiva in Nevardick. Rav Horowitz quickly made a special trip and headed out towards Germany. While he was on his way, he heard that people from another yeshiva were also traveling to the same place to get the building.   Rav Horowitz realized that there was the potential for an argument, a machlokes, to break out. He turned around and headed back to his own home, and never even asked what ever happened to that building.

We will close with the amazing words of the Zohar, quoted in Shemiras Haloshon Section 2 Chapter 7. “If there would be one Synagogue that would properly keep the trait of peace, we could merit the coming of the Messiah.” May we merit to be  that Synagogue, and merit to his coming, soon and in our times.

Wishing you and your family a Great Shabbos!!!!!!!! 

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

To sponsor an issue of the Kollel Connection, please email BJOC@bensalemoutreach.org  Sponsorships are only $36 a week.

Asara B’Teves | The Kollel Connection

Asara B’Teves | The Kollel Connection

Bensalem Jewish Outreach Center

December 13, 2013 – Candle lighting 4:16, Shabbos Ends 5:24

Note: Times are for Bensalem; Check your local calendar for exact times in your area.

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

This Friday we mark the fast day of Asara B’Teves, the tenth day of Teves. The reason we fast on this day, is because this is the day that Nebuchadnezzar, the Babylonian king, laid siege to Jerusalem, ultimately breaching its walls and destroying the Temple after a few years. The obvious question that we must ask is, why would we mark the day that siege was laid to Jerusalem so many years later? Our pain for the laying siege of Jerusalem would seem to be only as a prelude to its destruction; once we already fast on Tisha B’Av, the ninth day of Av, which was the day the Temple was actually destroyed, why would we also mark Asara B’Teves?

The Torah tells us that if Asara B’Teves would come out on a Shabbos, we would fast on Shabbos. At first glance, this seems very puzzling. We know that when Tisha B’Av comes out on Shabbos, we push off the fast until Sunday. Why would Asara B’Teves be different?

The only time we find that one may fast on Shabbos, is when one needs merit for a danger that they are in right now. When one is merely commemorating a past tragedy, one does not fast on the Shabbos. Asara Bteves commemorates the beginning of the physical destruction of the Temple. The lesson that it teaches us, is that we have to look not only at the end result, what happened at the end, but also at what caused the problem. If we are told this on the physical level, this is certainly true on a spiritual level. What the fast of Asara B’Teves teaches us, then, is that we have to look at the root cause of the destruction of the Temple, not just at the final outcome.

The Talmud tells us that the second Temple was destroyed because of baseless hatred among Jews. The Chofetz Chaim quotes the words of our Sages that not only did this sin of sinas chinam, baseless hatred, cause the destruction of the Temple 2,000 years ago. Every generation that the Temple is not built, we say it is for the same sin of baseless hatred that caused it to be destroyed. If so, the fast of Asara B’Teves tells us to look at the root of the destruction of the Temple as a current problem, not just as a past one. This helps us understand why we would fast on Asara B’Teves even if it is on a Shabbos – for we are not simply marking a past historical event, but are   marking the current cause of our exile.

If we want to rectify this sin, we must change the feeling of baseless hatred that affect us and instead plant feelings of love among Jews. In the Parsha  that we read this week, Parshas Vayechi, we read of the blessings that Jacob gives to his sons right before he dies. He tells them “Hikabzu vagida lachem es asher yikra eschem bacharis hayamim” – gather and I will tell you what will happen to you in the end of times. (Genesis 49:1) The shelah writes that the lesson Jacob was teaching his sons was, that if you want to get to the end of times – if you want to have the Messiah come, then the only way to accomplish this is hikabzu – be together. When you promote and feel unity, then you will be able to merit the coming of the messiah. May we soon see that time when all Jews unite, and our true feelings of care and concern for each other bring us the coming of the Messiah. Amen!

Wishing you and your family a Great Shabbos!!!!!!!! 

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

To sponsor an issue of the Kollel Connection, please email BJOC@bensalemoutreach.org  Sponsorships are only $36 a week.


Follow BJOC

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

BJOC on Twitter


%d bloggers like this: