Posts Tagged 'sacrifice'

Parshas Naso | The Kollel Connection

Parshas Naso | The Kollel Connection

Bensalem Jewish Outreach Center

May 29, 2015 – Candle lighting 8:02 pm, Shabbos Ends 9:11 pm

Note: Times are for Bensalem; Check your local calendar for exact times in your area.

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Welcome to the Kollel Connection.

We appreciate your comments and feedback.

This week we read Parshas Naso. In the Parsha we read of the sacrifices offered the first twelve days that the Tabernacle was consecrated. Each of the princes of the twelve tribes offered a personal sacrifice to consecrate the alter when it was inaugurated. Hashem told Moses to have each prince bring his unique sacrifice on a separate day, so that the time needed for all these sacrifices stretched out for twelve days. Each of these great men proceeded to bring the exact same amount of the exact same material for his sacrifice.  In an amazing and unusual change, the Torah describes each of these sacrifices is great detail and at great length. Twelve times the Torah repeats the exact same wording of a sacrifice, in great detail, with the name of a different prince.  The commentaries are all puzzled by this, as we know that the Torah is always very careful not to use extra words or even letters. We are taught that the point here is a lesson for all of us for life – that Hashem does not look at the simple physical aspects of what a person offers to Him. Each human being has their own feelings and emotions. The mitzvah of each person has a different mix of love, fear, joy, and dedication. Although to the human eye two sacrifices may seem to be the same, to Hashem they are totally different.

There is a second lesson that is taught here in these sacrifices. When the Torah describes the sacrifice of Nessanel ben Tzuar, who was the prince of the tribe of  Yissacher, it says twice the words “hikriv es korbano – he brought his sacrifice.” Why is this phrase repeated twice only by the sacrifice of Nesanel ben Tzuar?

The Kesav Sofer explains this, based on the fact that our Sages tell us that Nessanel ben Tzuar was the one who suggested to all the other princes that they bring this sacrifice. If so, he had a share in the sacrifice of each and every one of the princes. On the day that he himself brought his personal sacrifice, he had a double mitzvah – both for being the one who suggested that this be done, and also for being the one who actually did it. Therefore it says the words “hikriv es korbano – he brought his sacrifice” twice. On the day he offered a sacrifice, he is credited for both aspects of the mitzvah, both for actually doing it, and for being the catalyst to make it happen.

The lesson that we take from Nessanel, which is stressed at great length in other commentaries, is the great reward for us when we cause others to do something good. On is own merit, Nessanel would have gotten credit for only one sacrifice. Because he suggested that others do it he got credit for 12 sacrifices!!!

This is the importance and power of trying to always help others do mitzvohs. By doing that, we ourselves become elevated and closer to Hashem – much more than if we just focus on our own personal mitzvohs and connection to Him.

Wishing you and your family a Great Shabbos and a Blessed Shavuos!!!!!!!! 

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

To sponsor an issue of the Kollel Connection, please email BJOC@bensalemoutreach.org  Sponsorships are only $36 a week.

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Parshas Tsav | The Kollel Connection

Parshas Tsav | The Kollel Connection

Bensalem Jewish Outreach Center

March 27, 2015 – Candle lighting 7:00 pm, Shabbos Ends 8:09 pm

Note: Times are for Bensalem; Check your local calendar for exact times in your area.

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

Welcome to the Kollel Connection.

The Kollel connection this week is dedicated in honor of all the Jewish housewives who are working so hard to prepare Passover for their families. May Hashem give them only nachas and the joy of a beautiful holiday with their loved ones.

We appreciate your comments and feedback.

This week we read Parshas Tsav. In the parsha, we learn the details. of the various sacrifices that were offered in the temple. One of the sacrifices was a korban Todah, a thanksgiving offering. This sacrifice was offered by anyone who experienced any of the following four circumstances: A sick  person who recovered from their illness,  a person who was freed from incarceration, and a person who safely traveled over an ocean or through a desert. While these are the four cases that Jewish law requires to bring a sacrifice,  the truth is that every person has to feel appreciation and express gratitude for every minute of life that they have. Our sages express this thought by saying the following: “For every breath of air that a person takes,  he must thank G-d”. Rav Chiya bar Abba added,  the soul of a person seeks to leave this physical world all the time, but Hashem does not let this happen.  Rav Levi in the name of Rav Chanina explained, for every breath that a person takes,  he or she must praise Hashem.

In the amida prayer that we say three times a day,  we say the following words: ” Vchol Hachaim yoducha selah” – “And EVERY live person will thank you.” The commentaries explain that the word EVERY comes to stress that every single person,  no matter what their circumstances, must thank Hashem for the very life that they have. Even a person who is going through trying times, must try to recognize and feel gratitude for the very life that they have.

There is a beautiful story told that illustrates this point in a most powerful way. A group of people got lost in Siberia, in the middle of a dark night. As the night progressed, they were feeling the bitter cold winds that seemed to affect every part of their body, with no idea where to go. To make matters worse, their provisions had run out, they didn’t have adequate clothing, and as the night went on they felt their very life ebbing from them. Just as time was about to run out, a person miraculously appeared, and took them into his warm house, providing them with food, drink and shelter. Is it conceivable that any of these travelers who were on the verge of dying, would be crazy enough to complain that his co-traveler got a bigger piece than he did? Would they say something about not having a big enough pillow? Certainly every person there would feel immense gratitude to their host for the selfless act he did in saving their life.

This is the  feeling that we must have to Hashem. We have to feel gratitude to Him for every breath that we take, for the eyes that we can see with, for the ears that we can listen with, and all the other parts of our bodies that function. If the feelings of gratitude are truly felt, hopefully any feeling we had of jealousy, depression, and unhappiness will dissipate. Instead of complaining, we will feel true joy with what we have, and enjoy the great gifts that Hashem has given us to their fullest.

Wishing you and your family a Great Shabbos!!!!!!!! 

Rabbi Moshe Travitsky

To sponsor an issue of the Kollel Connection, please email BJOC@bensalemoutreach.org  Sponsorships are only $36 a week.


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